FaithBuilders

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Several months ago, I began a new ministry called FaithBuilders.

I have noticed (in my 32 years as a pastor) that many Christians either don’t know much about the Bible or that they feel overwhelmed when they try to apply what the Bible says to daily living. Sunday School teachers are doing their best to help children learn stories in the Bible; but, sometimes, the Sunday School curriculum that they use is built around so many unfamiliar stories that children remember only a few of them. We live in a time when more and more parents depend upon the Church to teach their children about God (while they, perhaps, go out for Sunday brunch?), and when other parents do not teach their children much about God or the Bible at all. And even some churches have shifted away from teaching basic stories from the Bible and have started teaching little children about compassion, kindness, gentleness and love – wonderful values and principles that are, sometimes, much too nebulous for little children to embrace and understand.

And I’ve asked myself, many times: “What is something that I could do to change that?”

I began to wonder if adults would find it far less intimidating to talk with their children about God if they were better equipped? What would happen, for example, if I created a list of 52 stories from the life of Jesus and asked people to focus on one story each week? Would adults take a few minutes at the end of each day to teach children a story from the Bible if I provided some easy-to-use tools? Would adults be willing to take a few minutes at the end of the day to read a story from the Bible and to talk with their children about it if I provided a few questions to get the conversation going? What about adults? Could an adult be encouraged to read stories from the Bible a few moments each day and to reflect upon questions that can help them to build a bridge between the stories in the Bible and daily living? What would it look like if I created a list of 52 stories from the life of Jesus to read during one year; and then, created a list of 52 well-known stories from the Bible to read throughout the course of another year? It seemed to be a win-win for everybody! Adults would be equipped. Adults could be encouraged to read the Bible and pray with their children. And the children, of course, would benefit from spending some time each day with their parent(s) or another adult(s) learning about God and building life-giving faith-links to the Bible that they could carry with them for the rest of their lives.

FaithBuilders is a ministry that’s been created to help you to build a bridge between where you are right now and where God wants to take you tomorrow. And, the best part about is that it’s easy, convenient, and life-changing! And, guess what? FaithBuilders can all be found right here on this blog! Just click the menu option above.

Why not visit FaithBuilders today? There is no better moment than right now to begin to explore the Bible in a new way, and there’s no better moment than right now to begin to introduce children to stories from the Bible that they can carry with them for the rest of their lives.

Click Here to Visit FaithBuilders

Spiritual Growth in Challenging Times

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I had the chance to gather in an online meeting with nearly thirty spiritual leaders that represented five different faith traditions this morning.

We, most certainly, had different ideas about God and spirituality. Imagine Jewish rabbis talking about how they celebrated Passover with Islamic leaders who are getting ready for Ramadan. Imagine Christians talking about Holy Week and Easter with a Buddhist. Imagine a Mormon speaking about the new temple that is being built in our local area while spiritual leaders from different faith traditions listened to her and shared in her excitement. It was an incredible experience!

People of all faith traditions are moving through challenging and unusual times.

Our shared humanity is something that reminds us that we’re vulnerable. It’s scary to think about the fact that, any time you leave your home, you are opening yourself up to the possibility of being infected by a deadly virus. Many people, who were wishing that their lives could slow down for a while, have too much time on their hands. Some people have even begun to openly rebel against social distancing and are protesting on the steps of capital buildings across America. And then, there are those who are grieving because they’ve lost people that they dearly loved in the last few weeks. There are students who were preparing for their high school or college graduation, but who are now mourning the fact that they will never see some of their friends again. Stress and tension are high. Some people are continuing to search for ways to be kind to others while others have a fuse that’s growing shorter every day.

Spiritual leaders, even across faith traditions, agree that isolation has some benefits.

Many of us are trapped in busy routines that can silence the voice of God. We pack our schedules with a nearly endless list of things to do. I recently asked a group of teenagers how many of them would like to tell their parents that they need to just stop once in a while – and every hand in the room went up. We search for significance through job promotions. We try to gain a sense of satisfaction by buying things that we don’t really need, or by bragging about how much money we have in the bank. Some of us have a Bible that we proudly display on the coffee table in our living room; and yet, we never open it. It’s sometimes hard to hear the voice of God because we never simply stop, and take time to reflect and pray. Jesus withdrew to the mountaintop many times during His life and ministry because He knew that God’s often found in silence and solitude.

One of the big benefits of isolation is that we have more time to spend in faith-building activities and in sensing our deep connections to the Divine.

Several months ago, I created something that I’m calling FaithBuilders. In my life and ministry, I’ve learned that many people are unfamiliar with even the basic stories in the Bible. I spend time with teenagers who don’t know how to find specific verses in their Bibles, and who have never heard the story of Joseph’s coat of many colors, the story of the Exodus, or even the story of Samson and Delilah. Today, more and more people have never heard many of the stories about Jesus that are in the Bible.

Spiritual leaders, even across faith traditions, agree that isolation has some benefits.

And that’s why I would like to encourage you to spend some time during these unusual days reconnecting with your faith, your God and your spirituality. And for those who are Christian, I’d like to introduce you, again, to FaithBuilders.

FaithBuilders is an easy-to-use tool that can be used by individuals who want to reflect upon their faith and revisit basic stories in the Bible, and FaithBuilders is something that parents can use with their children during these unusual times when children are not able to gather together in Sunday School classes.

We focus upon only one story in the Bible each week; and, as we’re doing that together, I provide some questions for you to think about (or even discuss with others). Some of the questions build bridges between the story you’re being asked to read and other stories in the Bible. Other questions help you to build bridges between your faith and daily living. Still other questions invite you to pray about challenges that you are facing in your own life and about some of the things that you’re seeing in other people’s lives. FaithBuilders is designed to help you to grow and to sense a deeper connection between God and daily living.

I hope that you’ll take some time to explore FaithBuilders and that you will be able to use this tool as a faith-building activity during these unusual days. As I indicated above, the spiritual leaders that I spoke with this morning agree that isolation has benefits. Why not use some time in these unusual days to revisit some of your beliefs and to become more deeply connected to faith-building activities? Perhaps, these difficult times can help you to become more aware of God’s presence and more able to hear God’s voice?

Click Here to Go to FaithBuilders

Read Through the Bible – Week 40

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Welcome back to “Read Through the Bible”

This weekend, many Christians will enter the season of Advent – a time of hope when we listen to the promises of God and a time of expectation when we hear God’s promises to renew His creation.

The news is filled with many stories that create fear and uncertainty these days. We hear about gunmen randomly shooting innocent people, and we hear about bombs rocking mosques in the Middle East. We’ve all heard about the increasing tensions between the United States and North Korea, and we’ve witnessed missile launches. We’ve seen people of great prominence fall from public grace as the #MeToo Movement has exposed stories of sexual harassment, and we’ve wondered what Congress’ new tax bill will mean to our lives in the coming years. Fear and uncertainty seem to be all around us. Some of us are asking questions that we’ve never asked in the past. And we need hope. We need to find a source of hope and peace that reminds us that God’s still in control and that the forces of good are, ultimately, going to win.

Advent is time of hope when we listen to the promises of God and a time of expectation when we hear God’s promises to renew His creation. But Advent is, also, a time when we are called to reflect and to honestly admit that, at least sometimes, we’re part of what’s wrong. We don’t always treat other people kindly; and, when people step on our toes, we don’t always forgive quickly. We want to sit in the driver’s seat and self-direct the course of our lives; and, when we do that, we can be blind to opportunities that God sets before us. We sometimes misinterpret the actions of others and we’re not always willing to admit that people can change. That’s the story of Jonah. And that’s one of the stories that we’re going to encounter in this week’s readings.

Many of us are probably already familiar with this epic tale. We can almost picture the frightened mariners casting lots, and we can almost imagine the look on Jonah’s face when his compatriots decided that he’s the problem. We can easily picture Jonah being swallowed by a great, big fish and being vomited-out upon the dry land. Maybe, as you read the story of Jonah this week, you’ll be able to sense the anger that he felt when God decided to have mercy upon the 120,000 people that Jonah thought God would destroy? The story of Jonah is a short one; but it’s, also, a very human story in which we can all find a part of ourselves.

What if we began the season of Advent by honestly admitting that, sometimes, we are the source of the problems in our own lives? What if we began the season of Advent by just stopping for a moment to think about the times when we’ve thwarted God’s plan for our lives and futures because we weren’t willing to give God the reins? Have you ever had a time when you struggled to accept the fact that God can forgive people that you can’t? Can Advent mark a new beginning in your life this year and help you to prepare yourself to meet the Christ whose birth we’re going to celebrate in just a few short weeks?

Advent is time of hope when we listen to the promises of God and a time of expectation when we hear God’s promises to renew His creation. But Advent is, also, a time when we recall that the renewal of God’s creation sometimes begins with us. Perhaps, we can use the next few weeks to renew our relationships with people that we’ve hurt or with the people who have hurt us? Perhaps, we can use the next few weeks to more intentionally pray and ask for God’s guidance? Perhaps, we can use the next few weeks to allow God to work in our hearts and in our lives, so that we’re more prepared to meet the Christ as He comes to us on Christmas?

Here are this weeks readings:

Sunday: Hebrews 5-7 – Monday: Numbers 29-32 – Tuesday: 2 Chronicles 11-15 – Wednesday: Psalms 117-118 – Thursday: Proverbs 28 – Friday: Jonah – Saturday: Acts 3-4

 

 

Read Through the Bible – Weeks 34 and 35

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Welcome back to “Read Through the Bible.”

We’ve been traveling through the Gospel of John in the last few weeks. John is the last of the Gospels in the Bible and was, chronologically, the last of the gospels, too. The Gospel of John contains stories that we don’t find in the other gospels. This is where we’ll find the story of the wedding at Cana in Galilee, the Samaritan woman by the well, and a lot of stories filled with theological statements. John’s famous for the “I AM” statements that we find throughout his gospel, and we’re going to encounter two of those statements as we read from John’s Gospel this week: “I am the door of the sheep” (John 10:7) and “I am the good shepherd” (John 10:14). But, carefully tucked between these two statements, we find one of my favorite verses in the Bible.

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.” (John 10:10)

What kinds of things are stealing energy and enthusiasm from your life right now? What parts of your life do you find most difficult? None of us can live our lives without facing some challenges and obstacles, but there are other things in life that drain us (almost on a daily basis) and that leave us with weighted-down spirits and heavy hearts. Do you find yourself praying about those things? What’s God been saying to you? Jesus tells us that the “thief” comes into our lives to steal and kill and destroy – but God is mightier than the “thief” that Jesus describes, isn’t He? What do you need from God right now? How might God be working in your life to take away the power of the “thief” that’s stealing energy and enthusiasm from your daily life?

Jesus also tells us that He has come that we may have life and have it abundantly. What kinds of things make you feel close to God right now? What kinds of things send you into the world filled with energy and excitement? St. Ignatius of Loyola tells us that God is a God who spurs us on in life, and who creates deep passions and excitement. What are you most excited about right now, and how can that excitement be a clear sign that God’s doing something big in your life? Perhaps, that’s something that you can lift-up to God in times of prayer this week, too? How can the excitement and passions that you feel about certain things help you to understand God’s plan for your life and your future?

I know that I’ve asked a lot of questions. But, as we travel through the Gospel of John, we’re brought face-to-face with a God who’s come into the world to bring life, to restore hope, to give peace in difficult times, and to give us strength to face the challenges in life that we’ll all face at some point. Where are you finding God in your life right now, and what do you need the most from God at this point in your journey? Why not take some time to talk with God about that today?

Week 34

Sunday: 1 Timothy 4-6 – Monday: Numbers 5-8 – Tuesday: 1 Chronicles 10-14 – Wednesday: Psalms 99-101 – Thursday: Proverbs 19 – Friday: Hosea 1-7 – Saturday: John 7-9

Week 35

Sunday: 2 Timothy 1-2 – Monday: Numbers 9-12 – Tuesday: 1 Chronicles 15-19 – Wednesday: Psalms 102-104 – Thursday: Proverbs 20-21 – Friday: Hosea 8-14 – Saturday: John 10-12

 

Read Through the Bible – Weeks 32 and 33

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Life’s been a bit crazy in the last few weeks….

I guess that a man doesn’t realize how much his wife does to support and to care for him until she decides to go away for ten days. I spent time at a coaching conference while my wife was away, and came home with a 3-hour homework assignment and a small pile of books to read. And, of course, ministry continues.  First Communion classes have started and our Catechism program is underway. We’re getting ready to celebrate Harvest Home this weekend with an Oktoberfest – and with a special Sunday that’s devoted to focusing our attention upon how God’s using us and the ministry of our congregation to do His work in a quickly-changing world. And, quite honestly, it’s all pretty overwhelming….

You could probably be writing something very similar, right? There are times when we find ourselves burning the candle at both ends and trying to light it in the middle. We all have times when we realize that there’s just not enough of us to around. And it’s hard for us – because we don’t always like to admit it. I often joke about the fact that I once asked God for an extra day each week – and He responded, in great mercy, by saying, “No!”

And yet, as we travel through the book of Proverbs, we find encouragement.

Commit your work to the Lord, and your plans will be established.” (Proverbs 16:3)

The heart of man plans his ways, but the Lord establishes his steps.” (Proverbs 16:9)

How is God helping to establish your plans? How is God leading you and guiding you in your life right now? Are you trying to do it all by yourself? Are you struggling because you can’t figure-out how to find the time to do all of the things that you think God wants you to do? Perhaps, it’s time to step back and commit your work to the Lord? Maybe, it’s time to step back and admit that you don’t really know the exact path forward, and ask God to guide you and strengthen you?

We all face overwhelming times when we’re not sure about the future and when we are even less sure about how to get there. Why not take some time to pray about that today – knowing that God has a wonderful plan for your life and that God will open doors that will lead you in the direction that He wants you to move?

Here are two weeks of readings:

Week 31

Sunday – 2 Thessalonians, Monday – Leviticus 25-27, Tuesday – 1 Chronicles 1-4, Wednesday – Psalms 93-95, Thursday – Proverbs 16, Friday – Daniel 1-6, Saturday – John 3-4

Week 32

Sunday – 1 Timothy 1-3, Monday – Numbers 1-4, Tuesday – 1 Chronicles 5-9, Wednesday – Psalms 96-98, Thursday – Proverbs 17-18, Friday – Daniel 7-12, Saturday – John 5-6

 

Read Through the Bible – Week 28

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Welcome back to “Read Through the Bible”

This is a place where we’re gathering together around God’s Word, and where we have decided to read through the Bible with each other and support each other as Christians. We’ve moved through more than half the Bible this year, and we’re pressing on toward the goal! But, if you’re new to this site, don’t be dismayed. Please feel free to jump on board! You don’t have to try to catch up with us, and we understand when people miss a reading or two along the way. This site is about encouraging you to spend some time with God’s Word and to allow the words of the Bible to speak to you.

We’ve been hearing a lot about disasters in the last few weeks, haven’t we?

Hurricane Harvey dumped several feet of water onto Texas and Louisiana, and then buried many other people under smaller amounts of water as it moved north. We’re hearing about raging fires in the western part of the United States and, just this morning, we heard stories about an earthquake off the coast of Mexico. Hurricane Irma is going to be moving across Florida this weekend – wreaking havoc as it slowly moves north. And many of us are feeling overwhelmed. We want to help, but we don’t know how. We want to offer our generous support, but many of us continue to struggle to simply make ends meet in our own homes. Just last week, I used my weekly installment of “Read Through the Bible” to lift-up a young woman and family that lost everything that they own – and I asked you to consider giving them some help. What’s a person to do?

This week, we’re going to be reading a parable from the Gospel of Luke. We’re going to hear about a nobleman who entrusted some people with a part of his wealth; and, when he did that, he asked them to take care of it. Some of the people invested the money that they had been given and doubled the nobleman’s wealth – one turning ten minas (each of them worth the amount of money that 13 farmers would be paid for a year’s labor) into twenty minas – and another turning five minas into ten minas. But one person, who was entrusted with only one mina buried it in the ground; and, at the end of the story, he just returned the mina that he had been given to the nobleman (who became enraged).

And, I guess this story has always been one that makes me think about the things that God has entrusted into my care, and about how I use those things (or don’t us them).

And, with that in mind and without pointing fingers, I’d like to ask you to think about how you’re using the gifts that God has place into your hands.

Some of us have already sent some of our money to support people who have lost their homes and all of their belongings in raging storms. Some of you many have even sent some money that will be given to Debbie and her family. Some of us support our local food bank or women’s shelter. Some of us volunteer time, so that programs like Meals-on-Wheels can continue to bring cooked food to people who are confined to their homes. Some of us cook meals and deliver them to our aging parents. Some of us watch our own children’s kids, so that they can go to work. Some of us donate money to places that are doing cancer research, while others support homeless shelters. And to all the people who are so faithfully using and investing the gifts that God has given, I say: “Well done, good and faithful servant.” (Matthew 25:23) You are a real blessing!

This week, in the midst of raging storms and fires, I want to challenge you to think about the fact that God’s happy when He sees you investing your time, energy, and financial resources in the lives of others. And how you do it isn’t as important as the fact the you ARE doing it. I guess that as we read one of Jesus’ parables this Saturday, we’re going to be reminded that the only person who angered the nobleman was the man who buried his mina in the ground to protect it and keep it safe, so that he could return what he’d been given to the nobleman without having risked it or increased it in any way.

Here are this week’s readings:

Sunday: Colossians 1-2 – Monday: Leviticus 13-15 – Tuesday: 2 Kings 6-10 – Wednesday: Psalms 81-83 – Thursday: Proverbs 10 – Friday: Ezekiel 25-30 – Saturday: Luke 19-20

 

Read Through the Bible – Week 26

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Welcome back to “Read Through the Bible”

This week, we come to the mid-point of our journey through the Bible! We’ve read some familiar stories from God’s Word as we’ve worked our way through the books of Genesis and Exodus; and we’re, presently, reading yet another account of Christ’s ministry in the Gospel of Luke. We’ve read the story of Job (a man of great faith who showed us a Godly way to move through times of struggle and adversity) and we’ve plunged head-first into some of the deep theology that’s contained in the letters of St. Paul. And now, we’re going to begin our journey through a rather short book of the Bible called Philippians.

Philippi was named after Philip of Macedon – the father of Alexander the Great. In 42 BC, Mark Anthony and Octavius wrestled Philippi from the hands of Brutus and Cassius, and transformed the entire region into a Roman colony. Philippi was frequently visited by people who were traveling through the region; and, thus, it was a strategic place for St. Paul to visit as he continued to spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ throughout the entire “world” of his time.

St. Paul wrote his letter to the Philippians while imprisoned in Rome.

Throughout his ministry, St. Paul supported his own ministry by continuing to work in the “secular” world. However, we do know that St. Paul received encouragement from the Christians in Philippi when he was visiting Thessalonica (Philippians 4:16,18) and when he was visiting Corinth (II Corinthians 11:9). The letter to the Philippians that is contained in the Bible was carried back to the church in Philippi by Epaphroditus, who had nearly died while bringing an offering of love to St. Paul while he was confined in prison (Philippians 2:25-30). As you are reflecting upon Sunday’s reading from Paul’s letter to the Philippians, spend some time thinking about Philippians 2:5-11 – an early form of the proclamation of the Christian Gospel.

Here are this week’s readings:

Sunday: Philippians 1-2 – Monday: Leviticus 7-9 – Tuesday: 1 Kings 19-22 – Wednesday: Psalms 75-77 – Thursday: Proverbs 7 – Friday: Ezekiel 13-18 – Saturday: Luke 15-16

 

Read Through the Bible – Week 24

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Welcome back to “Read Through the Bible”

This week, we will begin what (at least for me) is one of the most difficult books in the Bible. The book of Leviticus is packed with rules and regulations. We’ll begin by reading rules about burnt offerings, grain offerings, and peace offerings. We’ll read rules about sin and guilt offerings, about clean and unclean types of animals, about purification rites that women should perform after childbirth and about boundaries that God’s set in place to define healthy sexual relationships.

But rules are sometimes hard to follow, aren’t they?

Last week, when I was on vacation, I almost always set the cruise control on my car to 5 (or even 10) miles-an-hour over the speed limit. I’ve been known to run into a store and hurry things along, so that I can return to my car before someone notices that I didn’t put any money into the parking meter. I, sometimes, break God’s rules by refusing to forgive people who have hurt me, and the words that come out of my mouth aren’t always kind and up-lifting. I, perhaps like you, used to worry about the fact that there might be a big balance in the sky where God weighs all of the bad things that I’ve done and all of the good things that I’ve done – all in an effort to determine my eternal destiny.

Rules are important and the book of Leviticus is an important part of the Bible for us to read; but, as you’re working your way through Leviticus, I’d like you to continue to ask yourself an important question: “What makes me ‘right’ in the eyes of God?” The God of the Bible says, “You shall therefore keep all my statutes and all my rules and do them, that the land where I am bringing you may not vomit you out.” (Leviticus 20:22) But, in the very same Bible, St. Paul writes: “But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and Prophets bear witness to it – the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe.” (Romans 3:21)

How do you make sense of that? How do you live in “community” with other followers of Christ in a world where some Christians want to argue that the Law means nothing – and where other Christians still argue that “good people go to Heaven and bad people go to Hell?” How do you balance the Law of God with the Love of God? And, perhaps just as importantly, how will you “use” the words that you read as we work our way through the book of Leviticus? Will you highlight certain verses and use them to point-out the sin in the lives of other people, or will you struggle to make sense of what it means to live in a world where the God who writes rules continues to love us and forgive us?

Here are next week’s readings:

Sunday: Ephesians 1-3 – Monday: Leviticus 1-3 – Tuesday: 1 Kings 10-13 – Wednesday: Psalms 69-71 – Thursday: Proverbs 4 – Friday: Ezekiel 1-6 – Saturday: Luke 11-12

Read Through the Bible – Week 23

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“Read Through the Bible” has been created to help you to read the entire Bible over the course of one, short year! We hope that you’ve been traveling with us, but want you to know that you’re free to jump into God’s Word and read along with us at any time! And, if you miss a day or two (or even a week) along the way, it’s not a big deal. Don’t worry about what you’ve missed! Just jump back into the schedule – knowing that other people all around the world are reading the same passage that you are.

This week, we’re going to tackle an entire book of the Bible named Lamentations.

Lamentations is a book that was written by a person with a broken heart. The writer had most certainly witnessed the destruction of Jerusalem and its aftermath. We can see the author moving back and forth between horrifying confessions of sin and appeals for the kinds of help that can only come from God.

Lamentations is written in an “acrostic” style. Chapters 1, 2, and 4 contain twenty-two verses – corresponding to the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew alphabet. In the original Hebrew text, each of these verses begin with a different Hebrew letter – and all of the letters of the Hebrew alphabet are used in order. Chapter 3 is written in the same way and consists of three blocks of twenty-two verses; however, even though Chapter 5 of the book of Lamentations returns to the twenty-two verse pattern, no acrostic is present.

We don’t often experience a genuine lament in the 21st Century. However, the Jews use the book of Lamentations to mourn the destruction of Jerusalem to this very day.

Here are next week’s readings:

Sunday: Galatians 4-6 – Monday: Exodus 37-40 – Tuesday: 1 Kings 5-9 – Wednesday: Psalms 66-68 – Thursday: Proverbs 2-3 – Friday: Lamentations – Saturday: Luke 9-10

Blessings!

 

Read Through the Bible – Week 22

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“Read Through the Bible” is designed to help you to journey through God’s Word over the course of a year. Unlike other Bible reading programs, “Read Through the Bible” is not built upon the concept of beginning to read the Bible in the book of Genesis and reading straight through to the end of Revelation. It’s easy to get bogged-down in Biblical books like Leviticus and become discouraged enough to stop reading. “Read Through the Bible” has been created to help you to experience reading through the Bible in a different way.

This week, we’re going to begin Saint Paul’s letter to the Galatians – a rather complex and theologically rich book that was written to eradicate doctrinal errors.

You’ll see Saint Paul proclaiming that his apostleship is genuine. Saint Paul, then, goes on to talk about the importance of the Cross of Christ – arguing against the Jews. One of the main points that Saint Paul will make is that a “right” relationship with God is based on believing in Jesus – and is not built upon the foundation of “making points” with God by behaving in the “right way.” In this brief letter, St. Paul forever settles the questions that we might have about the relationship between faith in Jesus and building a relationship with God upon the Law of Moses.

And so, as you begin Saint Paul’s letter to the Galatians, you might want to ask yourself: How do I know that I’m “right” with God? You might, also, want to ask yourself: What is the difference between being a Christian and being a Buddhist or a Hindu? Am I building my relationship with God upon a pile of “good deeds” and accomplishments in order to somehow impress God, or am I trusting in Jesus who told me that He is the way, the truth, and the life? (John 14:6)

Here are next week’s readings:

Sunday: Galatians 1-3 – Monday: Exodus 33-36 – Tuesday: 1 Kings 1-4 – Wednesday: Psalms 63-65 – Thursday: Proverbs 1 – Friday: Jeremiah 47-52 – Saturday: Luke 7-8

Blessings!